The Philharmonie Project (Bruckner: Symphony No. 5, movements 1 & 4) (2011)

Lynne Marsh The Philharmonie Project-Bruckner 01

Installation view, Musée d'art contemporain de Montréal, 2011 (photographed by Richard-Max Tremblay)

Lynne Marsh The Philharmonie Project-Bruckner 02

Installation view, Musée d'art contemporain de Montréal, 2011 (photographed by Richard-Max Tremblay)

Lynne Marsh The Philharmonie Project-Bruckner 03

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Lynne Marsh The Philharmonie Project-Bruckner 04

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Lynne Marsh The Philharmonie Project-Bruckner 05

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Lynne Marsh The Philharmonie Project-Bruckner 06

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Lynne Marsh The Philharmonie Project-Bruckner 07

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Lynne Marsh The Philharmonie Project-Bruckner 08

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Lynne Marsh The Philharmonie Project-Bruckner 09

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Lynne Marsh The Philharmonie Project-Bruckner 10

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Lynne Marsh The Philharmonie Project-Bruckner 11

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Video Clip

Excerpt - 05:00
High Definition video installation | 50:00

single-channel video projection with stereo sound, freestanding wall/screen, tiered seating

Filmed during a performance of Bruckner’s 5th Symphony by the Berliner Philharmoniker Orchestra, The Philharmonie Project (Bruckner: Symphony No. 5, movements 1 & 4), reconfigures the protocols of spectacle, performance, behind the scene and audience. Instead of portraying the orchestra, the work features the video production team of the Philharmoniker's Digital Concert Hall as they film and broadcast the concert live, using six remote controlled cameras from a studio housed above the hall. Each technician performs a specific role, calling out numbers corresponding to the bars of music, cameras and camera positions as they translate the musical score into a visual choreography. Bruckner’s Symphonic music acts as an extension of the technicians’ performance while also providing a dramatic soundtrack, heightening the tension conveyed by the scene.

What we see is the mediation; nothing is performed on stage. The viewer is presented with a single screen image split into four continuous, unedited shots replicating the multi-camera tele-visual displays system used for broadcast. Two cameras are fixed in close-up on key team members –the ‘conductor’ who reads and counts out the score in order to cue the change of shots and the camera operator who controls all cameras remotely via a console. The third and fourth cameras wander across the scene revealing the video operator who switches live camera feeds and the camera assistant calling the upcoming camera positions to the camera operator. Like the camera shots they coordinate, the team move together and overlap, performing almost as a singular entity - like the entity of the orchestra itself.

Credits:
  • Director of Photography and Camera: Daniel Sippel
  • Camera: Lynne Marsh
  • Sound Capture and Mix: Johannes Krämer
  • Gaffer: Lars Oelmann
  • Editor: Mathieu-Bouchard-Malo
  • Colour Correction: Christoph Manz
  • Special thank-you for the gracious participation of the Berliner Philharmoniker Digital Concert Hall Team
  • Appearing:
  • Daniel Finkernagel & Alexander Lück: Directors
  • Volker Striemer: Camera Operator
  • Uli Peschke: Vision Mixer
  • Support from:
  • Christoph Franke: Creative Producer
  • Katharina Bruner: Head of Video Production
  • Ralf Bauer-Diefenbach: Video Supervisor
  • Anton Bruckner's Symphony Nr. 5 B-Dur, performed by the Berliner Philharmoniker and conducted by Bernard Haitink on March 12, 2011. Thank you to the Berliner Philharmoniker for permission to include the recording.
  • Funding: The Bambi Foundation, Conseil des arts et des lettres du Québec, University of Hertfordshire